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call jim crow. would anyone comment on that? >> thank you, mr. johnson. i -- your comments raised a couple of points. one is the issue of collateral consequences. it relates to what we were discussing and what mr. bachus alluded to. the impact of collateral consequences particularly on those who were convicted of lower level nonviolent drug offenses is just tremendous, and there's a project underway right now, under the auspices of the department of justice, being conducted by the mesh -- american bar association, to essentially catalogue all of the consequences and so policymakers and lawmakers can understand the implications of the criminalization they engage in when they make these criminal laws. >> gentleman's time is expired. last but not least the gentleman from new york, mr. jeffreys. >> thank you, mr. chair, and thank the witnesses for their very thoughtful testimony. it seems that as it relates to the problem of overcriminallization that this task force is encountering, there are potentially three areas of exploration as it relates to the problem we seek to address. you h
anniversary of the brady handgun violence prevention act. forcontrol advocates pass expanded prevention. jim brady was shot in the head during an assassination attempt on reagan and 1981. sarah brady is the founder of the brady foundation. she is the police chief of baltimore and gun violence victims were at the spent today. >> good morning. welcome. i am the president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. we are very clear to be here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the brady law and to release our new report. before we get to those things, we want to begin by showing why we're all here. why our mission is so vitally important and why we cannot ever give up. >> good morning. my name is kenny barnes. i live in washington dc. i'm a victim of senseless gun violence. this is a picture of my son. he was killed september 24, 2001. right here in washington, d.c. on the corner of 11th and u stre et northwest. >> good morning. my name is eddie. , my mother was shot to death in front of me. the gun was also turned on me. it malfunctioned. i am here today along with other victims and su
.com. founded by jim cramer, the street.com is an independent source for stock market analysis. cramer's action alerts plus service is home to his multimillion dollar portfolio. you can learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> where do we stand? home depot and macy's say spring is the thing to look toward, but one survey on housing says the best of the recovery may be behind us. so is the economy in the winter doldrums or are there real problems ahead? >>> grand canyon, a controversial bill in arizona has big business racheting up the pressure on the state's governor. >>> and being nimble. in the second part of our health care series, how one health insurance start-up is trying to compete with the big boys. we have that and a whole lot more on "nightly business report" for this february 25th. >> good evening, everyone, and welcome. after months of punishing snow storms and bone-rattling temperatures across much of the nation, a lot of people along with retailers, real estate agents, auto materials and just about everyone else seem to have bad case of spring fever. with the first official day of sp
died of lou gehrig's disease at age 29. >> as abc's jim avila reports, it is shown that traumatic brain injuries may be more widespread than originally thought. >> american kids love to play soccer. long seen as the safe alternative to u.s. football. for the first time, a soccer player has been diagnosed with cte. the very same repetitive head trauma disease found in some pro football players. >> our son, patrick, was doing headers at age three. >> patrick grange died nearly two years ago, his brain donated to scientist at boston university, studying cte, doctors announcing the frontal lobe of his brain was badly damaged. riddled with the same mind-numbing disease that leads to dementia and depression. >> getting hit in the head hundreds of thousands of times is not a normal part of life. it does not happen outside of sports and abuse. >> it is this move, the header, so dangerous for youngsters. players typically head the ball up to 12 times in a single game. watch again. that black and white sphere traveling up to 50 miles an hour. while football players are typically protected by a he
, has ordered his government to consider a request for humanitarian aid. nbc's jim maceda is in russia. the parliament yesterday promised a referendum on the country's future. what more is needed, do you think, to stabilize this situation? >> well, that's really going to be up to vladimir putin. he and russia are calling the shots with the pro russian faction inside ukraine. it's fine for the pro russian faction to want to have a referendum, but if russia isn't ready to accept these people and to accept a splitting apart of ukraine, which it says it hasn't been ready to do and won't accept, then that situation will simply two forward as long as putin wants it to. and in terms of the actual flash points, the tension is -- we haven't seen it this bad since this crisis began in krimiea. it wasn't just one, turns out it was two more airports hit today. there was a siege by these russian speaking military types, although russia denies any involvement at all of its military. and it looked like a repeat of yesterday's incident where similarly armed adults seized government buildings. today it
morning welcome to "squawk on the street" i'm carl quintanilla with jim cramer and david faber at the new york stock exchange. take a look at futures on a very big day for retail. we've already got at least half a dozen earnings out including target. we're going to walk you through all of it. bonds may react to new home sales when those hit the tape in about an hour, in the meantime, here's a look at the ten-year yield, europe is struggling and asia the yuan continues its losing street. and taferinget beating the street despite the impact from the massive customer data breach which shaved two cents per share of earnings and cut into sales. >>> andics inned quarterly results from a slew of other retailers that includes lowe's, dollar tree, tjx and abercrombie & fitch and barnes & noble. >>> and dream works animation down sharply in the premarket after posting fourth quarter results that were below expectations but we'll begin with target, reporting better-than-expected fourth quarter results but saying the massive data breach shaved two cents a share off of earnings and comps down 2.5 in t
is going to lose, the russian people are going to lose. >> jim maceda joins us from moscow. a "new york times" article quotes angela merkel having had a telephone conversation with vladimir putin saying she's not sure he is in touch with reality and he is in another world. what does this mean for an escalation of the situation here, do you think? >> what it means is we don't know what will happen next because we can't really anticipate what putin will do. putin is a product of the cold war. for him, no matter how you try to convince him otherwise, anything west of ukraine is enemy territory for him. and he in his own mind is seeing nato creeping up ever so closer -- or closely to his boarders. now, you mentioned secretary kerry going to kiev. that hopefully will calm the waters a little bit, at least keep kiev from doing something unintentionally or that unintentionally as ka lates the situation. but it is now true that the west has mobilized at least diplomatically against vladimir putin's military takeover of crimea. as you say, it's not firmly in his hands. that it's really, julia, u
's political and economic crisis? cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto explains. >> reporter: there's a lot of questions about russia's interest in the ukraine as well as the west. first a reminder here. ukraine is in europe not a million miles away, the capital few municipal-bond miles away that americans travel to all the time, paris, london, rome. western border key u.s. aslice, slovakia, hungary and romania, poland. ukraine not a member of nato but there's been talk about bringing them in. let's get a better sense of russia's interest there. you look at crimea. on the tip of that peninsula, the sevastopol military headquarters. access to the black sea, mediterranean, atlantic, essential for russia and first place that many of those 6,000 and even more russian troops went when they crossed the border from russia into crimea. sovereign ukrainian territory. let's look inside the country as well because there's a split. western part of the country here liens towards europe, 5% of the population in these parts speak ethnic russian. eastern part 75% here speak russian, ethnic f
. [applause] i also want to mention m bassett -- i would also want to mention american ambassador jim warlick. ,fghanistan faces challenges and all of us are aware of those challenges. the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place echo the afghan presidential candidates, a number of them i spoke to in kabul are in favor of starting ae bsa. i think it is certainty that it will be signed. whether or not karzai signs it is irrelevant. we need to make sure we plan effectively for him not signing it and moving forward. i truly hope that any of the ambassador dobbins mentioned that might occur if there is delay are mitigated effectively by the great planning capacity that our military and state department have. i don't believe there's is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the , as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this cop -- to , is topic of afghan security have visited afghanistan 20 or 30 times and lived there for a couple of years. when andrew, alex and i were working on afghanistan in the earlier decade, the afghan di
forces military, civilian and, of course, our afghan colleagues that continue despite every day, jim, thank you very much. alex and i were saying he gave his keynote address and a what are the rest of us supposed to say? andrew asked if i would talk about reconciliation, elections and a very important topic i think, the politics of the future relationship of between afghanistan and pakistan. i would be pleased to do that but before i do, i just wanted to step back just for a moment really and make three points and asked one question. i think it's relevant to the entire conversation we're going to have today. first point, that's the one that has been emphasized here both in the fields that we saw previously and ambassador dobbins speech and the points that intimate. it's really important it seems to me when we talk about afghanistan to stop just for a moment and recognize what has been achieved. not just what has been achieved but what has been achieved at such great cost on the part of afghans, part of the united states military and civilian, and, of course, our international partner
and pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs us state department spokesperson jim said keyes says the united states supports japan's efforts to resolve outstanding issues with north korea in a transparent manner. officials from the us japan and south korea have been working together to court in aid their policy on the north's nuclear program. a team of japanese engineers has tested a system that is intended to reduce the swaying of skyscrapers during powerful earthquakes. it consists of a massive pendulum that will counteract any movement in the building caused by a quake many buildings in tokyo and osaka should slowly and quietly during the two thousand and eleven earthquake. even though the epicenter was hundreds of kilometers away. the swaying stop the elevators and damage the walls and ceilings engineers have been studying ways to reinforce high rise buildings again this long period the ground of motion they tested the new system that's been installed on the roof of the research facility near tokyo the three hundred tonne pendulum moves in the opposite direction of the way to reduce this
to the new york stock exchange, catch up with jim cramer, "squawk box" will be right back. in today's market, a lot can happen in a second. with fidelity's guaranteed one-second trade execution, we route your order to up to 75 market centers to look for the best possible price, maybe even better than you expected. it's all part of our goal to execute your trade in one second. i'm derrick chan of fidelity investments. our one-second trade execution is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. call or click to open your fidelity account today. ...return on investment wall isn't a street... isn't the only return i'm looking forward to... for some, every dollar is earned with sweat, sacrifice, courage. which is why usaa is honored to help our members with everything from investing for retirement to saving for college. our commitment to current and former military members and their families is without equal. >>> let's get down to the new york stock exchange where jim cramer joins us now. a lot to talk about. tesla today given what they announced yesterday and whether you
gharib. brought to you in part by -- >> the street.com. founded by jim cramer, the street.com is an independent source for stock market analysis. cramer's action alerts plus service is home to his multimillion dollar portfolio. you can learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> mixed signals. new home sales surge while application for mortgages drop. ivy zelman the analyst who called housing's top and bottom makes sense of the conflicting data for us. >>> a penny for your thoughts. j.c. penney reports a smaller loss than expected and says sales will improve. but have investors already lost faith in the company's turn around? >>> so what's at risk in the third part of our health care
are thrilled with you stepping up to do that. jim dobbins is someone that has taught us now i won't say how long but going on at least 15 years about how we need to think about peace and security and the u.s. involvement. so the fact that you have stepped up to the school there couldn't be a better person and perspective and i want to acknowledge bill taylor who i saw walking in. bill is also -- i met bill first in afghanistan in 2002 and he remains one of the best examples of a diplomat and boss that i've ever had. when i traveled to afghanistan for the first time 21 years ago, i would come to witness what i believe is one of the greatest foreign-policy mistakes that our country has ever made and that was the abandonment of afghanistan and the gradual or sometimes not gradual distraction to afghanistan, its communities, its infrastructure, its relationships with its neighbors that we are still climbing out of today. i have over my career watched conflict unfold slowly into the development unfold slowly. and conflict is much more efficient. and it costs actually a lot less to perpetrate. de
, the longview. we need to take a long view here. the panel will include four experts including jim dobbins' predecessor. it will be moderated by andrew wilder who heads the center for south and central asia here at the u.s. institute of peace. the second panel will be on the future of media in afghanistan. again, four distinguished david as chaired by moderator from voices of america. we hope that you can conclude from today's program that afghanistan still matters to the united states. america's national security therest are best served by emergence of a stable and prosperous afghanistan. this objective can still be and what has been accomplished in afghanistan over the last decade offers some grounds for optimism that we can achieve this objective. afghanistan has made great progress over the last 12 years in health, education, women's rights and economic development. you will hear about that today in these remarks. you will also hear about the political progress that the afghan people have made. a presidential election is scheduled for this coming april 5. for the first time, there is t
will mention ambassador jim warlick and ambassador dobbins who did a great job. so we have a great agreement in place. what is the future with that agreement? it will be difficult. afghanistan faces challenges and, all of us are aware of those challenges but i think the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place? the afghan people have spoken. the afghan presidential candidates, a number of whom i spoke to in kabul when i was there are all in favor of signing the bsa i think it's a virtual certainty the bsa will be signed. the issue whether president karzai signs it or not in my view is irrelevant. we need to plan on effectively him not signing it and move forward. i truly hope that any of the costs ambassador dobbins said might occur if there is delay might be effected by the great planning capacity our agencies have. i don't think there is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the long game as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this topic of the afghan security forces which i not going to be expert i visited afghanistan
freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start with a thank you but i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim and michael o'hanlon. put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out in this but we thought this is such a critical issue as you're trying to follow over the weekend of a lot of people talking about a lot of things that nobody had chance to catch their breath. and have a dialogue. and i think this is an enormous opportunity with three preseason and listen been looking at these issues in studying this part of the world for a long time. to actually have a deep breath and a kind of reasoned, principled discussion about what's happened, what does it mean, where are we going from your and what are our options. i couldn't be more thrilled at these guys are jumping into do this. chris is the executive director at the foreign policy institute. kim holmes is a distinguished fellow, long distance grew not just your heritage but also at the u.s. sta
up by 171 points above fair value, gaining back the ground that was lost yesterday and then some. jim cramer is warning -- he's just warning be cautious on this. you shouldn't have sold on yesterday's big news and you shouldn't be buying today. >> okay. let's take a look at stocks to watch. if you do, maybe you want to buy something. radio shack posted a larger than expected fourth quarter loss. revenues fell short of analysts estimates. they saw a 19% drop in same-store sales and announced plans to close about 1,100 underperforming u.s. stores. >> remember those ads in the super bowl? the radio shack ads that was we're getting rid of the radio shack of the '80s. >> it's pretty cool. you go into a radio shack these days. >> 1,100 stores to close. >> i've seen some cool stores. the new ones are impressive. i want to just say -- >> wonder how many have had the new makeover? >> i've only seen one. i thought it was pretty cool. >>> auto parts retailer autozone reported profit of $5.63 a share, beating estimates by 7 cents. same-store sales in this case were up 4.3%. auto zone says the sev
." we're joined by jim from moscow. it may not be a zero sum game as far as kerry is concerned but it is as far as vladimir putin's concerned, isn't it? he's been incredibly silent over the last two weeks. what's going on with him here? >> reporter: that's right. what happens next will obviously be very much dependent on what vladimir putin does next, and so far we simply haven't heard from the guy. he had a meeting yesterday with his top security council but no information came out of that and i think that this is really what's driving the uncertainty about what russia does next, because putin, after all, must be reeling from the loss of face, if nothing else, from this revolution in ukraine especially given the timing of it, right at the height of putin's olympic glory, and we still don't know what he's planning. perhaps he's waiting to see what the makeup is of the new government in kiev, before he plays his hand. in any case, julia, the overall sense we're getting from experts we're talking to here in moscow is that putin would only use intervention or even encourage a spli
ambassador marc grossman who is jim dobbins predecessor aspects representative. and it will be moderated by andrew wilder, who heads the center for south and central asia here at the u.s. institute of peace. the second panel will be on the future of media in afghanistan. again four distinguished panelists and chaired by david ensor as moderator from head of voice of america. we hope that you can conclude from today's program that afghanistan still matters to the united states. that america's national security interests are best served by the emergence of a stable and prosperous afghanistan. that this objective can still be achieved and that, what has been accomplished in afghanistan over the last decade offers some ground for optimism that we can achieve this objective. for afghanistan has made great progress over the last 12 years in health, education, women's rights, and economic development. and you will hear about that today in these remarks and panelists. and you will also hear about the political progress that the afghan people have made. a presidential election is scheduled for th
. hi, jim. what's the intention here do you think from the russian government? >> reporter: well, the russian government wants two things, to exert its influence in the region but at the same time it doesn't want yet i think nor do other analysts we've spoken here to rock the boat too much. there's no question, ross, texts have spiked in the past 24 hours just as russia's foreign ministry came out condemning large scale human rights violations against its ethnic russians in the ukraine, the russian defense ministry confirmed that fighter jets were now on high alert along the border with ukraine that's of course part of the surprise, war games we've been reporting on since yesterday including long range aircraft, warships as well as some 150 troops and some 900 tanks. the main flash point is ukraine's crimea peninsula, strategic for russia, the home of the black sea fleet, scuffles broke out yesterday between proand anti-russian protesters outside crimea's parliament. overnight the building was seized by armed men speaking russian with rpgs, sniper rifles, in effect vigilantes who
there in virginia. and rightfully so because i can share a personal story, mr. speaker, from a senator, jim davis, from my home state who was a county commissioner and now a state senator. mr. meadows: i asked him why do you have such a hard time balancing the budget here in the state? and he gave me two words -- unfunded mandates. and why is that? because we continue to pass regulation after regulation after regulation, send them down to the states, ask the states to deal with them, the states say, well, we don't have money to implement this, they send it even further to the county government, so what happens? property taxes go up at the local level. state income taxes go up there. all because we believe that we know what is best here in washington, d.c., on how to implement rules and regulations. mr. speaker, i would suggest that during the first term of the obama administration we saw a 10% increase in regulatory budgets. now, that's a 10% increase in regulatory budgets when the average american hardworking taxpayer saw their budgets go down. there's something wrong with this, mr. speaker, and
for having me. >> tomorrow, we'll speak with jim demint and russell simmons will join us here on set. >>> and plenty of enthusiasm last night at the oscars. that is until louis berg dorff ran into larry david. >> "morning joe"? this is an insult to "morning joe," okay? you're insulting "morning joe." >> look at how good looking i am. >> there's no insult here. >> joe doesn't care about show business. >> who are you wearing? you look wonderful. >> who am i wearing? who gives a [ bleep ]. who am i wearing. >> when you get in a scene, matthew mcconaughey beats his chest and hums -- >> are you out of your mind? >> maybe, a little bit. >> i would think about, what would larry david do. >> and you do that? >> i act accordingly. it's so hard. it's really hard. yeah. ooh, what do i do now? >> i don't know. >> it's very hard. ♪ ♪ ♪ millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fra
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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